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Use Picadillo 35T with Microchip's Graphics Library

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  • Use Picadillo 35T with Microchip's Graphics Library

    We are familiar with and use MPLABX IDE, the Microchip Graphics Library and their Graphics Display Designer in addition to VGDD (also a graphics display design tool).

    We really like the 4D hardware and would like to use the Picadillo 35T for the GUI as well as for the application, however due to a very short runway for our next two products we just don't have the time to learn UECIDE and the Majenko TFT library. Additionally, I don't believe a graphics display design tool is available.

    Does anyone know of a reasonable and inexpensive approach to solve our delimma? I'm pretty sure other Microchip IDE and library users would find the Picadillo an attractive solution for products that are low to moderate in quantities sold.

    Majenko, might you have a solution?

    Any help is immensely appreciated!
    Don

  • #2
    The display is based around the Himax HX8357 chip (http://www.crystalfontz.com/controll...nuary_2010.pdf). It is directly connected to the Parallel Master Port of the PIC32 (see the Picadillo manual for a schematic).

    If you can craft a driver for the HX8357 suitable for the Microchip Graphics Library then there is no reason why you couldn't continue to use that. I have no knowledge of the internals of the Microchip Graphics Library, nor its more modern replacement, Harmony, both of which I shy away from due to licensing issues.

    The initialization sequence and command codes can be lifted direct from the TFT library and used to replace the equivalent parts of an existing driver for a similar screen - the TFT library is licensed under the BSD 3-clause license - so creating a driver shouldn't be too much work.

    However, you would not be allowed to distribute that driver. They only way you could do that would be if you wrote it completely from scratch and didn't include any Microchip code whatsoever.

    Hence we recommend using the TFT library. You can also use 4D Workshop to create GCI/DAT based layouts and use the gciWidget library to render them - though that is limited only to simple widgets like buttons and knobs at the moment.

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    • #3
      Thank you Majenko for your prompt reply.

      Originally posted by majenko View Post
      ...the TFT library is licensed under the BSD 3-clause license - so creating a driver shouldn't be too much work.
      However, you would not be allowed to distribute that driver. The only way you could do that would be if you wrote it completely from scratch and didn't include any Microchip code whatsoever.
      I understand and agree that lifting the driver from the TFT lib, compiling and linking it into our own application would in violation of the TFT license. However, I'm confused by the sentence about writing the driver from scratch and NOT including any Microchip code.

      The Microchip Library for Applications (MLA) license allows source code modifications/additions/deletions and permits its use as long as it's used with a Microchip product. It is open source except for that restriction. Our usage would be only in the form of machine code embedded into our final product (a railroad related electronic device).

      In reference to your recommendation of using the TFT lib with GCI/DAT, I will investigate to see if that is a viable solution for us. Would really be nice if that yields the best path to a solution.

      Again, thank you for your help.
      Don

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      • #4
        MLA is more open than Harmony, actually. With Harmony the license has this:

        (b) Software License Grant. Subject to the terms of this Agreement, Microchip grants strictly to Licensee a personal, worldwide, non-exclusive,
        non-transferable limited license to use, modify (except as limited by Section 1(f) below), copy and distribute the Software only when the Software is
        embedded on a Microchip Product that is integrated into Licensee Product or Third Party Product pursuant to Section 2(d) below.
        Any portion of the Software (including derivatives or modifications thereof) may not be:
        (i) embedded on a non-Microchip microcontroller or digital signal controller;
        (ii) distributed (in Source Code or Object Code), except as described in Section 2(d) below.
        Lifting code from the TFT library and using it for your own ends is perfectly legitimate. You can take what you want from it and do what you want with it

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        • #5
          Did this go any farther. Is there a driver for Harmony that can be shared?

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